cord blood solutions | when do you not need to continue storing cord blood for a child

Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a common complication after an allogeneic transplant (from a source other than the patient) where the patient’s immune system recognizes the cells as “foreign” and attacks the newly transplanted cells.  This can be a potentially life threatening complication.  The risk for developing GVHD is lower with cord blood transplants than with marrow or peripheral blood transplants.  Patients who do develop GVHD after a cord blood transplant typically do not develop as severe of a case of GVHD.   Cord blood also is less likely to transmit certain viruses such as cytomegalovirus (CMV), which poses serious risks for transplant patients with compromised immune systems.
Even if a sick child has a sibling donor, there’s only a 25 percent chance that cord blood will be a perfect match — and an equal chance it won’t match at all. That’s why public donations are so important. So far, many more stem-cell transplants have been done using cord blood stored in public banks. From 2000 to 2004, more than 2,200 unrelated transplants were done nationwide.
The materials and information included in this electronic newsletter (Newsletter), including advertisements, are provided as a service to you and do not reflect endorsement by the Parent’s Guide to Cord Blood Foundation (the “Foundation”). The Foundation is not responsible for the accuracy and completeness of information provided by guest authors, outside sources, or on websites linked to the Newsletter. The Foundation reserves the right at any time to remove materials and information from the Newsletter without communication with the author or organization. Access to and use of all Newsletter information is at the user’s own risk. The Foundation is not liable for any damages of any kind, nature or description (whether direct, consequential or punitive) arising out of or relating to information referenced in the Newsletter, or related in any way to the user’s access to the Newsletter. The Foundation’s Terms of Use is expressly incorporated herein. Questions can be directed to info@parentsguidecordblood.org.
Private cord blood banking can benefit those with a strong family history of certain diseases that harm the blood and immune system, such as leukemia and some cancers, sickle-cell anemia, and some metabolic disorders. Parents who already have a child (in a household with biological siblings) who is sick with one of these diseases have the greatest chance of finding a match with their baby’s cord blood. Parents who have a family history of autism, Alzheimer’s, and type 1 diabetes can benefit from cord blood. Although these diseases aren’t currently treated with umbilical cord steam cells, researchers are exploring ways to treat them (and many more) with cord blood.
Your baby isn’t the only one who may benefit from having access to preserved newborn stem cells. The cells can potentially be used by siblings and parents, too. In many cord blood treatments, stem cells from a matched family member are preferred.
There has been considerable debate about the ethical and practical implications of commercial versus public banking. The main arguments against commercial banking have to do with questions about how likely it is that the cord blood will be used by an individual child, a sibling or a family member; the existence of several well-established alternatives to cord blood transplantation and the lack of scientific evidence that cord blood may be used to treat non-blood diseases (such as diabetes and Parkinson’s disease). In some cases patients may not be able to receive their own cord blood, as the cells may already contain the genetic changes that predispose them to disease.
Cord blood is the blood that remains in the umbilical cord and placenta following birth. This blood is usually discarded. However, cord blood banking utilizes facilities to store and preserve a baby’s cord blood. If you are considering storing your baby’s cord blood, make sure to use a cord blood bank accredited by the American Association of Blood Banks (AABB), like Viacord.
Unlike other banks, CBR uses a seamless cryobag for storage. The seamless construction decreases the potential for breakage that can occur in traditional, seamed-plastic storage bags. Prior to storage, each cryobag is placed in a second overwrap layer of plastic, which is hermetically sealed as an extra precaution against possible cross contamination by current and yet unidentified pathogens that may be discovered in the future. CBR stores the stem cells in vaults, called dewars, specially designed for long-term cryostorage. The cord blood units are suspended above a pool of liquid nitrogen that creates a vapor-phase environment kept at minus 196 degrees Celsius. This keeps the units as cold as liquid nitrogen without immersing them in liquid, which can enable cross-contamination. Cryopreserved cord blood stem cells have proven viable after more than 20 years of storage, and research suggests they should remain viable indefinitely.
The syringe or bag should be pre-labeled with a unique number that identifies your baby. Cord blood may only be collected during the first 15 minutes following the birth and should be processed by the laboratory within 48 hours of collection.
Of course, this means that expectant parents will have one more choice to make about their child’s health and future. “I certainly don’t think parents should feel guilty if they don’t privately bank their child’s blood,” Dr. Kurtzberg says. The best choice is the one that works for your family.
There are some hospitals that have dedicated collections staff who can process mothers at the last minute when they arrive to deliver the baby. However, in the United States that is the exception to the rule.
Stem Cell Storage is not included in their price. Viacord and Cord Blood Registry both charge for annual storage. This means that when you pay for your initial cord blood and/or cord tissue storage you will also have to pay annually for storage.
The next step at either a public or family bank is to process the cord blood to separate the blood component holding stem cells. The final product has a volume of 25 milliliters and includes a cryoprotectant which prevents the cells from bursting when frozen. Typical cost, $250 to $300 per unit.
The process is safe, painless, easy and FREE. Your physician or midwife collects the cord blood after your baby has delivered, so it does not interfere with the birthing process. The collection will not take place if there is an concern for your safety or that of your baby.
No one knows how stem cells will be used in the future, but researchers hope that they may be used to treat many conditions, like Alzheimer’s, diabetes, heart failure, spinal cord damage, and other conditions.
Cord Blood Registry is a registered trademark of CBR® Systems, Inc.  Annual grant support for Parent’s Guide to Cord Blood Foundation is made possible by CBR® through the Newborn Possibilities Fund administered by Tides Foundation.
BioInformant is the first and only market research firm to specialize in the stem cell industry. BioInformant research has been cited by major news outlets that include the Wall Street Journal, Nature Biotechnology, Xconomy, and Vogue Magazine. Serving Fortune 500 leaders that include GE Healthcare, Pfizer, and Goldman Sachs. BioInformant is your global leader in stem cell industry data.
Donating your baby’s umbilical cord blood may offer a precious resource to a patient in need of a life-saving stem cell transplant. Umbilical cord blood is rich in blood-forming stem cells, which can renew themselves and grow into mature blood cells. After your baby is born, these cord blood cells can be collected, preserved and later used as a source of stem cells for transplantation for patients with leukemia, lymphoma, and other life-threatening blood diseases.
The Stem Cell Therapeutic and Research Act was passed in 2005, which supports building a public reserve of 150,000 cord blood units from ethnically diverse donors in order to treat more than 90% of patients in need of HSC transplants.  Donors from ethnic minority patients are particularly in need due to the greater variation of HLA-types in non-Caucasian ethnicities. Thirty-five percent of cord blood units go to patients of diverse ethnic and racial backgrounds.
In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration regulates any facility that stores cord blood; cord blood intended for use in the person from whom it came is not regulated, but cord blood for use in others is regulated as a drug and as a biologic.[6] Several states also have regulations for cord blood banks.[5]
Congratulations to the Marepalli family, this week’s winners of a free year of storage! CBR Clients: Enter for a chance to win by tagging a family photo with #CBRFamilyContest! #MyStemCellsLiveAtCBR pic.twitter.com/RLIx54bLqS
Life Line Stem Cell asks mothers arriving for delivery to donate all perinatal tissue: cord blood, cord tissue, and the placenta. Cord blood donations that are eligible for transplant are sent to a public cord blood bank; the tissue collections go towards research programs.
As a mother-to-be, you can decide that your baby’s first act may be saving another person’s life. You can do this by choosing to donate your baby’s umbilical cord blood to the St. Louis Cord Blood Bank’s First Gift℠ Donation Program.
There are some diseases on the list (like neuroblastoma cancer) where a child could use his or her own cord blood. However, most of the diseases on the proven treatment list are inherited genetic diseases. Typically, a child with a genetic disease would require a cord blood unit from a sibling or an unrelated donor. 
This is only the beginning. Newborn stem cell research is advancing, and may yield discoveries that could have important benefits for families. CBR’s mission is to support the advancement of newborn stem cell research, with the hope that the investment you are making now will be valuable to your family in the future. CBR offers a high quality newborn stem cell preservation system to protect these precious resources for future possible benefits for your family.
“One of the wonderful things about cord blood is that unlike bone marrow, you don’t always need a perfect match in order for it to work,” says Dr. Kurtzberg, who performed the first unrelated cord-blood transplant in the U.S. And it was a public donation that ultimately saved Anthony Dones. Within a week of starting a search, the National Cord Blood Program, a public bank operated by the New York Blood Center, found a “close enough” match. Had the now-3-year-old been forced to rely on a bone-marrow match, he might still be waiting.
http://markets.financialcontent.com/bostonherald/news/read/36631633
http://www.wmcactionnews5.com/story/38663417/cord-blood-banking-stem-cell-research-pros-cons-review-launched

http://www.hawaiinewsnow.com/story/38663417/cord-blood-banking-stem-cell-research-pros-cons-review-launched

http://www.wandtv.com/story/38663417/cord-blood-banking-stem-cell-research-pros-cons-review-launched

http://www.nbc12.com/story/38663417/cord-blood-banking-stem-cell-research-pros-cons-review-launched

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCspc5xs7rmywaELYKBqCOAg
Cord blood contains mesenchymal stem cells but is much more abundant in hematopoietic stem cells. Cord tissue, on the other hand, contains some hematopoietic stem cells but is much richer in mesenchymal stem cells. Cord tissue, or Wharton’s jelly, is the protective layer that covers the umbilical cord’s vein and other vessels. Its MSCs can become a host of cells including those found in the nervous system, sensory organs, circulatory tissues, skin, bone, cartilage, and more. MSCs are currently undergoing clinical trials for sports injuries, heart and kidney disease, ALS, wound healing and autoimmune disease. As with cord blood, cord tissue is easily collected at the type of birth and holds great potential in regenerative medicine. Learn more about cord tissue banking here.
The Cord Blood Bank of Arkansas launched operations in 2011, providing both public donation and family banking services. They accept donations from ANY HOSPITAL IN THE STATE OF ARKANSAS.  They also accept donations from bordering states so long as the donor is an Arkansas resident.
In order to preserve more types and quantity of umbilical cord stem cells and to maximize possible future health options, Cryo-Cell’s umbilical cord tissue service provides expectant families with the opportunity to cryogenically store their newborn’s umbilical cord tissue cells contained within substantially intact cord tissue. Should umbilical cord tissue cells be considered for potential utilization in a future therapeutic application, further laboratory processing may be necessary. Regarding umbilical cord tissue, all private blood banks’ activities for New York State residents are limited to collection, processing, and long-term storage of umbilical cord tissue stem cells. The possession of a New York State license for such collection, processing and long-term storage does not indicate approval or endorsement of possible future uses or future suitability of these cells.
Founded in 1992, CBR has stored more than 600,000 cord blood and cord tissue collections from 3,500 hospitals in over 100 countries and partnered with institutions to establish multiple FDA-regulated clinical trials. CBR has helped more than 400 families use their cord blood stem cells for established and experimental medical treatments, more than any other family cord blood bank. CBR’s goal is to expand the potential scope of newborn stem cell therapies that may be available to patients and their families.
There is a high likelihood that immediate biological family members could benefit from the baby’s cord tissue stem cells, with parents having a 100% likelihood of being compatible, siblings having a 75% likelihood of being compatible, and grandparents having a 25% likelihood of being compatible.16,50  Another reason why parents today are choosing to bank their baby’s cord tissue for the future. 
Cord Blood Registry® (CBR®) is the world’s largest newborn stem cell company. Founded in 1992, CBR is entrusted by parents with storing samples from more than 600,000 children. CBR is dedicated to advancing the clinical application of cord blood and cord tissue stem cells by partnering with institutions to establish FDA-regulated clinical trials for conditions that have no cure today.
Chloe Savannah Metz’ mother donated her baby girl’s cord blood to the NCBP in December 2000. “Many thanks to the New York Blood Center for giving us the opportunity to donate our cord — we hope to give someone a second chance!” – Christine Metz
Canadian Blood Services acknowledges the funding of provincial, territorial and federal governments. The views expressed in this document are those of Canadian Blood Services and do not necessarily reflect those of governments.
Cord tissue is rich in another type of stem cell. Although there are no current uses, researchers are excited about the benefits cord tissue stem cells may offer in potential future users, such as regenerative medicine. By storing both, you’ll have potential access to more possibilities

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *