cord blood comparison | what do they check for in cord blood

“One of the wonderful things about cord blood is that unlike bone marrow, you don’t always need a perfect match in order for it to work,” says Dr. Kurtzberg, who performed the first unrelated cord-blood transplant in the U.S. And it was a public donation that ultimately saved Anthony Dones. Within a week of starting a search, the National Cord Blood Program, a public bank operated by the New York Blood Center, found a “close enough” match. Had the now-3-year-old been forced to rely on a bone-marrow match, he might still be waiting.
Stem cell transplant using an individual’s own cord blood (called an autologous transplant) cannot be used for genetic disorders such as sickle cell disease and thalassemia, because the genetic mutations which cause these disorders are present in the baby’s cord blood. Other diseases that are treated with stem cell transplant, such as leukemia, may also already be present in a baby’s cord blood.
Your own cord blood will always be accessible. This applies only if you pay to store your cord blood at a private bank. The blood is reserved for your own family; nobody else can access or use it, and it will never be allotted to another family or be donated to research. If you donate your cord blood to a public bank, on the other hand, anyone who needs compatible cord blood can have it; there’s no guarantee that it will be available if and when your family needs it.
Here are 5 Things You Need to Know About Cord Blood Before You Deliver Your Baby according to @TodaysMama #cordblood #cordbloodbanking #cordbloodregistry #newborn #stemcell todaysmama.com/2017/12/5-thin… via @todaysmama
Umbilical cords have traditionally been viewed as disposable biological by-product.  Cord blood, however, is rich in multi-potent hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs).  Recent medical advances have indicated that these stem cells found in cord blood can be used to treat the same disorders as the hematopoietic stem cells found in bone marrow and in the bloodstream but without some of the disadvantages of these types of transplants.  Cord blood is currently used to treat approximately 70 diseases including leukemias, lymphomas, anemias, and Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID). Six thousand patients worldwide have been treated with cord blood stem cell transplants, although the FDA considers the procedure to be experimental.  These multipotent stem cells also show promise for the treatment of a variety of diseases and disorders other than those affecting the blood. 
^ a b Walther, Mary Margaret (2009). “Chapter 39. Cord Blood Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation”. In Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Forman, Stephen J.; Negrin, Robert S.; Blume, Karl G. Thomas’ hematopoietic cell transplantation stem cell transplantation (4th ed.). Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. ISBN 9781444303537.
http://www.wtvm.com/story/38663417/news
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http://www.wandtv.com/story/38663417/cord-blood-banking-stem-cell-research-pros-cons-review-launched

http://www.nbc12.com/story/38663417/cord-blood-banking-stem-cell-research-pros-cons-review-launched

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCspc5xs7rmywaELYKBqCOAg
Gift of Life is a non-profit charity that seeks to help Jewish patients find a transplant match.  They recruit both bone marrow donors and cord blood donations from the Jewish community.  Gift of Life operates their own accredited cord blood laboratory that participates in the national NMDP network.
Cord blood is used the same way that hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is used to reconstitute bone marrow following radiation treatment for various blood cancers, and for various forms of anemia.[1][2] Its efficacy is similar as well.[1]
If you want the blood stored, after the birth, the doctor clamps the umbilical cord in two places, about 10 inches apart, and cuts the cord, separating mother from baby. Then she inserts a needle and collects at least 40 milliliters of blood from the cord. The blood is sealed in a bag and sent to a lab or cord blood bank for testing and storage. The process only takes a few minutes and is painless for mother and baby.
Cord blood is used to treat children with cancerous blood disorders such as leukaemia, or genetic blood diseases like Fanconi anaemia. The cord blood is transplanted into the patient, where the HSCs can make new, healthy blood cells to replace those damaged by the patient’s disease or by a medical treatment such as chemotherapy for cancer.
^ a b Thornley, I; et al. (March 2009). “Private cord blood banking: experiences and views of pediatric hematopoietic cell transplantation physicians”. Pediatrics. 123 (3): 1011–7. doi:10.1542/peds.2008-0436. PMC 3120215 . PMID 19255033.
In the public arena there has been much discussion on the benefits of for-profit private cord blood banking over public banking.  Numerous for-profit companies offer new parents the option of collecting and storing cord blood for future use by the donor infant, siblings, or other family members.  Parents may choose to bank cord blood if they have a family history of a particular disease or disorder, or as a means of “biological insurance” in case their child or family member develops a medical condition or becomes injured requiring a transplant.
If everyone donated cord blood to public registries for the ‘common good’ this would increase the chances of someone benefiting from a double cord blood transplant. This far outweights the actual probability of the person who donated the sample being able to usefully use it for themself. 
There is no cost associated with public cord blood banking, but you do give up your rights to your baby’s stem cells at the time of donation. The public cord blood bank owns the donation. If your child or another family member needs a transplant in the future, there is no guarantee you would have access to your baby’s cord blood.
Expecting and want to help push the science of cord blood forward? Enroll now and we’ll make a donation toward cord blood education and research for #CordBloodAwarenessMonth! bit.ly/2mpcB1b pic.twitter.com/6WJYDaAgdu
Sutter Neuroscience Institute has conducted a landmark FDA-regulated phase II clinical trial to assess the use of autologous stem cells derived from cord blood to improve language and behavior in certain children with autism.
  Heart disease is one of the deadliest killers in the world to date. Congestive heart failure, a condition found secondary to many major cardiac diseases, possesses its own high mortality rate. Fifty percent of those diagnosed with congestive heart failure will die within the…
Collected cord blood is cryopreserved and then stored in a cord blood bank for future transplantation. Cord blood collection is typically depleted of red blood cells before cryopreservation to ensure high rates of stem cell recovery.[4]
New Jersey Cord Blood Bank can accept donations without pre-registration at participating hospitals that have on-site staff.  Donations are also accepted from certain hospitals via partnerships with local charities.
Canadian Blood Services acknowledges the funding of provincial, territorial and federal governments. The views expressed in this document are those of Canadian Blood Services and do not necessarily reflect those of governments.
Cord blood banking is not always cheap. It’s completely free to donate blood to a public cord blood bank, but private banks charge $1,400 to $2,300 for collecting, testing, and registering, plus an annual $95 to $125 storing fee.
Whether you’re having trouble with your account, or would like to make a suggestion, Canadian Blood Services offers you quick and convenient options to troubleshoot or get in touch. Contact us via live chat, consult our FAQ, send an email feedback@blood.ca, or give us a call at 1 888 2 DONATE (1-888-236-6283).
Much research is focused on trying to increase the number of HSCs that can be obtained from one cord blood sample by growing and multiplying the cells in the laboratory. This is known as “ex vivo expansion”. Several preliminary clinical trials using this technique are underway. The results so far are mixed: some results suggest that ex vivo expansion reduces the time taken for new blood cells to appear in the body after transplantation; however, adult patients still appear to need blood from two umbilical cords. More research is needed to understand whether there is a real benefit for patients, and this approach has yet to be approved for routine clinical use.
*Fee schedule subject to change without notice. If a client has received a kit and discontinues services prior to collection, there is no cancelation fee if the kit is returned unused within two weeks from cancelation notice; otherwise, a $150 kit replacement fee will be assessed. †Additional courier service fee applies for Alaska, Hawai’i and Puerto Rico. ††Applies to one-year plan and promotional plan only. After the first year, an annual storage fee will apply. Cryo-Cell guarantees to match any written offer for product determined to be similar at Cryo-Cell’s sole discretion. ** Promotional Plan cannot be combined with any other promotional offers, coupons or financing.
Current applications for newborn stem cells include treatments for certain cancers and blood, metabolic and immune disorders. Additionally, newborn stem cell preservation has a great potential to benefit the newborn’s immediate family members with stem cell samples preserved in their most pristine state.
Florida Hospital for Children is conducting an FDA-regulated phase I clinical trial to investigate the use of a child’s stem cells derived from their own cord blood as a treatment for acquired sensorineural hearing loss.
Banking cord blood is a new type of medical protection, and there are a lot of questions that parents may want to ask. The Parent’s Guide to Cord Blood organization even has questions it believes all parents should ask their cord blood banks. We have answers to these and other frequently asked cord blood questions in our FAQs. If you can’t find the answer for which you are looking, please feel free to engage one of our cord blood educators through the website’s chat interface.
 If cord blood can be used for parents is the very common question that many adults have. And of course, the answer is Yes”. Actually, it’s very common reason for the parents to save and store their baby’s umbilical cord blood. And it’s not…
As a mother-to-be, you can decide that your baby’s first act may be saving another person’s life. You can do this by choosing to donate your baby’s umbilical cord blood to the St. Louis Cord Blood Bank’s First Gift℠ Donation Program.
Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute jointly oversee the Cord Blood Donation Program to provide hope to all patients in need of a life-saving stem cell transplant. For more information about the stem cell transplant program please visit The Stem Cell/Bone Marrow Transplant Program at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center (DF/BWCC) web site.
CORD:USE is directed by leading doctors in cord blood transplantation.  Public donations collected by CORD:USE are sent to the Carolinas Cord Blood Bank, a FACT-accredited laboratory under the direction of Dr. Joanne Kurtzberg.
Carolinas Cord Blood Bank at Duke (CCBB) is headed by Dr. Joanne Kurtzberg. Expectant parents who have a child in need of therapy with cord blood, especially the new therapies in clinical trials at Duke, may be eligible for directed donation through CCBB.
  There are many “what if” situations that we all consider in our life. One of the most serious is “What if a child or other family member was to become seriously ill?” Cord Blood Banking clinics have been growing exponentially in response to this…
^ Caseiro, AR; Pereira, T; Ivanova, G; Luís, AL; Maurício, AC (2016). “Neuromuscular Regeneration: Perspective on the Application of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Their Secretion Products”. Stem Cells International. 2016: 9756973. doi:10.1155/2016/9756973. PMC 4736584 . PMID 26880998.
Currently, ViaCord has released the most cord blood units for medical transplant and has the highest cord blood transplant survival rate among companies who have disclosed complete transplant data. The one-year survival rate of patients who were treated with ViaCord cord blood units is 88%, and the long-term patient survival rate is 82%.1
In New Zealand, a hopeful couple are participating in a study that will use one of their son’s cord blood stem cells to research treatment for another son’s cystic fibrosis. In Chicago, people are using their sibling’s stem cells to successfully treat sickle cell disease. And countless other families have banked their second child’s cord blood after their first child was diagnosed with leukemia. Many of those children are alive and well today thanks to their sibling’s stem cells. Since the first successful cord blood stem cell transplant on a sibling in 1988, over 30,000 cord blood transplants have been performed worldwide.
For these and other reasons, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and many physicians do not recommend private cord blood banking except as “directed donations” in cases where a family member already has a current need or a very high potential risk of needing a bone marrow transplant. In all other cases, the AAP has declared the use of cord blood as “biological insurance” to be “unwise.” [Read the AAP’s news release at http://www.aap.org/advocacy/archives/julcord.htm ]
It’s possible that storing your child’s cord blood cells now may be useful one day in combating these diseases. For now, these treatments are only theoretical. It’s also not clear if stem cells from cord blood — as opposed to stem cells from other sources — will be useful in these potential treatments.

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