cord blood transplant | reston hospital center cord blood

​nbiased and factual information. The Foundation educates parents, health professionals and the general public about the need to preserve this valuable medical resource while providing information on both public cord blood donation programs and private family cord blood banks worldwide. Learn more about our global community.
Luckily for expectant parents, cord blood can be easily collected at the baby’s birth via the umbilical cord with no harm to the mother or baby. This is why pregnancy is a great time to plan to collect and bank a baby’s cord blood.
Stem cell transplants from a related family member are less likely to be rejected, therefore having your baby’s stem cells available makes it less likely you would have to search for an unrelated donor who is a match
Umbilical cord blood contains haematopoietic (blood) stem cells. These cells are able to make the different types of cell in the blood – red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets. Haematopoietic stem cells, purified from bone marrow or blood, have long been used in stem cell treatments for leukaemia, blood and bone marrow disorders, cancer (when chemotherapy is used) and immune deficiencies.
After the birth of a baby, the umbilical cord and placenta are typically discarded as medical waste, but if requested, stem cells from the cord blood inside of them can be collected for storage or donation. Stem cells can be used to treat a variety of diseases. Learn what these diseases are in our comprehensive list of diseases treatable with cord blood stem cells.
Cord blood is used the same way that hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is used to reconstitute bone marrow following radiation treatment for various blood cancers, and for various forms of anemia.[1][2] Its efficacy is similar as well.[1]
If someone doesn’t have cord blood stored, they will have to rely on stem cells from another source. For that, we can go back to the history of cord blood, which really begins with bone marrow. Bone marrow contains similar although less effective and possibly tainted versions of the same stem cells abundant in cord blood. Scientists performed the first bone marrow stem cell transplant in 1956 between identical twins. It resulted in the complete remission of the one twin’s leukemia.
Another way scientists are working with stem cells is through expansion technologies that spur replication of the cord blood stem cells. If proven effective and approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, these expansion technologies will allow scientists to culture many stem cells from a small sample. This could provide doctors and researchers with enough stem cells to treat multiple family members with one cord blood collection or provide the baby with multiple treatments over time. To better prepare for the day when these expansion technologies are more easily accessible, some cord blood banks have begun to separate their cord blood collections into separate compartments, which can easily be detached from the rest of the collection and used independently. You can learn more about Cryo-Cell’s five-chambered storage bag here.
STEM CELLS are found in cord blood, cord tissue, and placenta tissue. These cells are highly valuable to your baby, the mother, and possibly other family members. When you save these stem cells with Americord®, you ensure that they are securely stored for you and your family’s future needs. Learn more >
Bone marrow and similar sources often requires an invasive, surgical procedure and one’s own stem cells may already have become diseased, which means the patient will have to find matching stem cells from another family member or unrelated donor. This will increase the risk of GvHD. In addition, finding an unrelated matched donor can be difficult, and once a match is ascertained, it may take valuable weeks, even months, to retrieve. Learn more about why cord blood is preferred to the next best source, bone marrow.
CBR created the world’s only collection device designed specifically for cord blood stem cells. CBR has the highest average published cell recovery rate in the industry – 99% – resulting in the capture of 20% more of the most important cells than other common processing methods.
Cord tissue is rich in another type of stem cell. Although there are no current uses, researchers are excited about the benefits cord tissue stem cells may offer in potential future users, such as regenerative medicine. By storing both, you’ll have potential access to more possibilities

Cord blood is also being studied as a substitute for normal blood transfusions in the developing world.[23][24] More research is necessary prior to the generalized utilization of cord blood transfusion.[23]
Up to 180 mL of blood can be taken from an umbilical cord for use in stem cell transplants.  Due to the experimental nature of cord blood transplants, such transplants are considered on a case-by-case basis.  This blood is collected from the umbilical cord, processed,[1] and cryogenically preserved shortly after the umbilical cord is clamped. This blood can be cryogenically preserved for public or private (family) use.  Public registries store cord blood donated for availability to the general public for transplantation.  Private registries store cord blood on behalf of families who wish to use this blood for the donor infant, siblings, or other family members.  Private cord blood banks charge a collection fee (ranging from $1,000-2,000) and an annual storage fee (approximately $150 per year).
As noted, there are different ways to process cord blood, and although the type of processing method doesn’t always enter the conversation on cord blood banking, it is a big part of the purity of any cord blood collection. Red blood cells can have a negative impact on a cord blood transfusion. In addition, there is a certain number of stem cells that need to be present in order for the cord blood to be effective in disease treatment. Each processing method has the ability to better reduce the number of RBCs and capture more stem cells. Some processing methods like AutoXpress and Sepax are automated to ensure a level of consistency across all collections. HES is preferred by some banks because it was the original processing method used by most banks and it has a proven track record. You can read more about the different cord blood processing methods here.
Banking cord blood is a new type of medical protection, and there are a lot of questions that parents may want to ask. The Parent’s Guide to Cord Blood organization even has questions it believes all parents should ask their cord blood banks. We have answers to these and other frequently asked cord blood questions in our FAQs. If you can’t find the answer for which you are looking, please feel free to engage one of our cord blood educators through the website’s chat interface.
^ a b Ballen, KK; Gluckman, E; Broxmeyer, HE (25 July 2013). “Umbilical cord blood transplantation: the first 25 years and beyond”. Blood. 122 (4): 491–8. doi:10.1182/blood-2013-02-453175. PMC 3952633 . PMID 23673863.
Private companies offer to store cord blood for anyone who wants it done, whether or not there is any medical reason known to do so at the time. The fee for private storage varies, but averages about $1,500 up front and $100 per year for storage. When there is no one in the family who needs a transplant, private storage of a newborn’s cord blood is done for a purely speculative purpose that some companies have termed “biological insurance.”
I am currently 38 years old and I would like to have my blood and it’s stem cells harvested via peripheral blood draw to be stored in definitely. Do you offer this service? If so, how can I arrange for my family?
Most of the diseases on the proven treatment list are inherited genetic diseases. Typically, these treatments require a donor transplant, as from a sibling. In fact, research shows that treatments using cord blood from a family member are about twice as successful as treatments using cord blood from a non-relative.9a, 17 To date, over 400 ViaCord families have used their cord blood 56% were for transplant.1
MSCs and MSC-like cells are useful multipotent stem cells that are found in many tissues. While MSCs can be isolated from adults via peripheral blood, adipose tissue, or bone marrow apiration, MSCs derived from the discarded umbilical cord offer a low-cost, pain-free collection method of MSCs that may be cryogenically stored (banked) along with the umbilical cord blood sample. From the umbilical cord, isolation of cells from the Wharton’s jelly has the greatest potential for banking, presently, because the most cells can be isolated consistently. The challenge for the future is to define industrial-grade procedures for isolation and cryopreservation of umbilical cord-derived MSCs and to generate Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved standard operating procedures (SOPs) to enable translation of laboratory protocols into clinical trials. This represents a paradigm shift from what has been done with umbilical cord blood banking because the cord blood cells do not require much in the way of processing for cryopreservation or for transplantation (relatively). For such a challenge to be met, researchers in the field of umbilical cord-derived MSC need to organize and reach consensus on the characterization, freezing/thawing, and expansion of clinical-grade cells for therapies and tissue engineering. Thus, more and more umbilical cord stem cells can be diverted from the biohazardous waste bag and into the clinic, where their lifesaving potential can be realized.
Osteopetrosis is a genetic disease, so this means that doctors could use a sibling’s cord blood cells to treat Anthony, but they cannot use his own cells because the disease is in every cell in his body. In fact, a majority of the diseases listed in private banking firms’ marketing material as treatable with stem cells are genetic diseases.
There are over 130 public cord blood banks in 35 countries. They are regulated by Governments and adhere to internationally agreed standards regarding safety, sample quality and ethical issues. In the UK, several NHS facilities within the National Blood Service harvest and store altruistically donated umbilical cord blood. Trained staff, working separately from those providing care to the mother and newborn child, collect the cord blood. The mother may consent to donate the blood for research and/or clinical use and the cord blood bank will make the blood available for use as appropriate.
While the stem cell count is smaller during a cord blood transplant, these cells multiply quickly, and researchers are studying new methods to increase cells naturally. Compared to bone marrow, cord blood cells multiply faster and don’t require an exact match type to complete a successful transplant. Some techniques medical experts are testing to increase the amount of stem cells include:
Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a common complication after an allogeneic transplant (from a source other than the patient) where the patient’s immune system recognizes the cells as “foreign” and attacks the newly transplanted cells.  This can be a potentially life threatening complication.  The risk for developing GVHD is lower with cord blood transplants than with marrow or peripheral blood transplants.  Patients who do develop GVHD after a cord blood transplant typically do not develop as severe of a case of GVHD.   Cord blood also is less likely to transmit certain viruses such as cytomegalovirus (CMV), which poses serious risks for transplant patients with compromised immune systems.
Since 1988, cord blood transplants have been used to treat over 80 diseases in hospitals around the world. Inherited blood disorders such as sickle cell disease and thalassemia can be cured by cord blood transplant. Over the past decade, clinical trials have been developing cord blood therapies for conditions that affect brain development in early childhood, such as cerebral palsy and autism.
Stem cells are defined simply as cells meeting three basic criteria (illustrated in Fig. 1. First, stem cells renew themselves throughout life, i.e., the cells divide to produce identical daughter cells and thereby maintain the stem cell population. Second, stem cells have the capacity to undergo differentiation to become specialized progeny cells (1). When stem cells differentiate, they may divide asymmetrically to yield an identical cell and a daughter cell that acquires properties of a particular cell type, for example, specific morphology, phenotype, and physiological properties that categorize it as a cell belonging to a particular tissue (2). Stem cells that may differentiate into tissues derived from all three germ layers, for example, ectoderm, endoderm, and mesoderm, are called “pluripotent.” The best example of pluripotent stem cells are the embryonic stem cells (ESCs) derived from the inner cell mass of early embryos. In contrast with ESCs, most stem cells that have been well characterized are multipotent, i.e., they may differentiate into derivatives of two of the three germ layers. The third property of stem cells is that they may renew the tissues that they populate. All tissue compartments contain cells that satisfy the definition of “stem cells” (3), and the rate at which stem cells contribute to replacement cells varies throughout the body. For example, blood-forming stem cells, gut epithelium stem cells, and skin-forming stem cells must be constantly replaced for normal health. In contrast, the stem cells in the nervous system that replace neurons are relatively quiescent and do not participate in tissue renewal or replace neurons lost to injury or disease.
Exciting news reported by US News & World Report: Results from a cerebral palsy clinical trial at Duke University have been published. Read all the details on our blog now! bit.ly/2AsXSY4 pic.twitter.com/e6vxcXxTuO
There are several cord blood banks that are accredited by the American Association of Blood Banks. Most offer information on cord blood banking and provide private cord blood banking services. With a little research, you should be able to locate a credible cord blood bank online.
Today, cord blood stems cells are used in the treatment of nearly 80 diseases, including a wide range of cancers, genetic diseases, and blood disorders.2 In a cord blood transplant, stem cells are infused in to a patient’s bloodstream where they go to work healing and repairing damaged cells and tissue. When a transplant is successful, a healthy new immune system has been created. 
Like any insurance, cord-blood banking isn’t cheap. Banks initially charge from $1,000 to $2,000 to collect and process the stem-cell units, which are stored for a family’s exclusive use. When you factor in additional costs for shipping (about $150 for a medical courier), the doctor’s collection fee (prices can range from $150 to $500), and annual storage fees averaging $100 per year for 18 years, parents can expect to pay up to $4,000 in expenses not covered by insurance.
Cord blood stem cells are classified as adult (or non-embryonic) stem cells.  Embryonic stem cells (ESC) are believed to be more advantageous for the  treatment of disease or injury due to their pluripotent nature; that is, they have the ability to differentiate into all the cells present in the human body derived from the three germ layers (endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm).  Adult stem cells are multipotent, implying  that they can only differentiate into a limited number of cells typically within the same “family” (e.g., hematopoietic stem cells give rise to red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets). 
While cord-blood companies herald the possible future treatments of many adult diseases with stem cells, they rarely mention a key issue. Researchers have greater hopes for the potential of embryonic stem cells, which are thought to have the ability to develop into many different types of cells. It is not known whether the stem cells in cord blood have that ability; until recently, it was thought that they (like those in bone marrow) could only regenerate blood and immune cells.
Private cord blood banking (also known as family banking), is preferred for families in a situation, where they currently have a family member suffering from a genetic disorder or have a family history of this type of disorder. By using a private cord blood bank, such as CariCord, your baby’s cord blood and tissue are stored for exclusive use by your family. It will always be there and readily available if it is ever needed. If it is donated to a public bank it can be accessed by anyone who is a match to it and there are no guarantees that it would be available, should your family ever need it later.