cord blood collection kit | when do you not need to continue storing cord blood for a child

Umbilical cord blood is the blood left over in the placenta and in the umbilical cord after the birth of the baby. The cord blood is composed of all the elements found in whole blood. It contains red blood cells, white blood cells, plasma, platelets and is also rich in hematopoietic stem cells. There are several methods for collecting cord blood. The method most commonly used in clinical practice is the “closed technique”, which is similar to standard blood collection techniques. With this method, the technician cannulates the vein of the severed umbilical cord using a needle that is connected to a blood bag, and cord blood flows through the needle into the bag. On average, the closed technique enables collection of about 75 ml of cord blood.[3]
Stem cells are amazingly powerful.  They have the ability to divide and renew themselves and are capable turning into specific types of specialized cells – like blood or nerve. After all, these are the cells responsible for the development of your baby’s organs, tissue and immune system
The majority of programs that accept cord blood donations require the mother to sign up in advance. In the united States, the current requirement is to sign up by the 34th week of pregnancy. This cannot be over-stressed; time and time again, mothers who want to donate are turned away because they did not inquire about donation until it was too late.
Lack of awareness is the #1 reason why cord blood is most often thrown away. For most pregnant mothers, their doctor does not even mention the topic. If a parent wants to save cord blood, they must be pro-active. ​
Donating cord blood can help families and researchers. If a mother qualifies, the umbilical cord processing and storage is free, and can protect a child from over 80 different diseases. In the next several years, researchers will find new ways to treat even more conditions.
CBR Cord Blood Education Specialists are available 7 days a week (Monday – Friday 6 AM – 9 PM PST and Saturday – Sunday 6 AM – 4 PM PST) to respond to consumer inquiries. In addition, consumers may request to schedule a call with a CBR Cord Blood Education Specialist at a specific date and time.
Umbilical cord blood is blood that remains in the placenta and in the attached umbilical cord after childbirth. Cord blood is collected because it contains stem cells, which can be used to treat hematopoietic and genetic disorders.
Be the Match is a nonprofit organization that supports public cord blood banks’ efforts to encourage donations. It maintains the largest public listing of donated cord blood available for transplantation in the United States. The organization has facilitated more than 7,000 unrelated cord blood transplants since the year 2000.
If you feel that the procedure is too expensive for your child, check with the hospital to see if there are any programs and/or grants available that can assist with the procedure.  Some companies do offer financial aid.
The Leading the Way LifeSaving Ambassadors Club is a recognition program honoring sponsor groups for outstanding performance in reaching or exceeding blood drive collections goals.  CBC presents a Leading the Way plaque to winning sponsors on an annual basis. The award is based on three levels of achievement:
In addition to their immune-suppressive properties, MSCs appear to exhibit a tropism for damaged or rapidly growing tissues. For example, following injection into the brain, MSCs migrate along known pathways when injected into the corpus striatum (44). MSCs migrated throughout forebrain and cerebellum, integrated into central nervous system cytoarchitecture, and expressed markers typical of mature astrocytes and neurons after injection into the lateral ventricle of neonatal mice (45). MSCs injected into injured spinal cord were found to form guiding “cord,” ushering in regenerating fibers (46). MSCs may assist with regeneration in stroke (47–51) or myocardial ischemia (52–55) by release of trophic factors such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, or angiogenic factors (56–61).
Not surprisingly, this emotional pitch is working — especially because the seemingly unlimited potential of stem cells has dominated the news in recent years. From 2003 to 2004, for example, the number of couples opting to use a private bank increased by 55 percent to 271,000. The three biggest companies — who have the majority of the approximately $250 million market — are vying for business.
In the body, stem cells live in specialized “niches,” microenvironments included stem cell support cells and extracellular matrix. The niche microenvironment regulates the growth and differentiation of stem cells (4–6). Understanding the role of the various “support” cells and the environment of the niche is helpful for in vitro manipulation and maintenance of stem cell populations. For example, a normal atmospheric oxygen concentration of 21% is relatively toxic to stem cells, and growth in “hyoxic” conditions of 2–3% oxygen is preferred (7). Other components of the niche, such as the extracellular matrix and growth and angiogenic factors, play a role in stem cell regulation. Understanding the stem cell microenviornment is rapidly unfolding and is an important topic which, however, is beyond the scope of this article.
There is little doubt that scientists believe umbilical cord blood stem cells hold promise for the future. Cord blood stem cells are already used to treat blood disorders such as aplastic anemia, and research is underway to determine if they can treat other more common conditions like type 1 diabetes. But many experts question whether many companies’s marketing materials confuse or even mislead parents about the usefulness of private banking.
StemCyte is a global cord blood therapeutics company.  StemCyte participates in the US network of public cord blood banks operated by Be The Match. In addition, StemCyte operates the National Cord Blood Bank of Taiwan, whose units are also listed with Be The Match.
In March 2004, the European Union Group on Ethics (EGE) has issued Opinion No.19[16] titled Ethical Aspects of Umbilical Cord Blood Banking. The EGE concluded that “[t]he legitimacy of commercial cord blood banks for autologous use should be questioned as they sell a service, which has presently, no real use regarding therapeutic options. Thus they promise more than they can deliver. The activities of such banks raise serious ethical criticisms.”[16]
Please note: ClinImmune Labs – University of Colorado Cord Blood Bank – CariCord’s activities for New York State residents are limited to collection, processing, and long-term storage of umbilical cord tissue. Possession of a New York State license for such collection, processing, and long-term storage does not indicate approval or endorsement of possible future uses or future suitability of umbilical cord tissue-derived cells.

^ a b Thornley, I; et al. (March 2009). “Private cord blood banking: experiences and views of pediatric hematopoietic cell transplantation physicians”. Pediatrics. 123 (3): 1011–7. doi:10.1542/peds.2008-0436. PMC 3120215 . PMID 19255033.
There are usually two fees involved in cord blood banking. The first is the initial fee that covers enrollment, collection, and storage for at least the first year. The second is an annual storage fee. Some facilities vary the initial fee based upon the length of a predetermined period of storage.
Marketing materials by Viacord and Cord Blood Registry, the two largest companies, do not mention that cord blood stem cells cannot be used by the child for genetic diseases, although the fine print does state that cord blood may not be effective for all of the listed conditions.
As cord blood is inter-related to cord blood banking, it is often a catch-all term used for the various cells that are stored. It may be surprising for some parents to learn that stored cord blood contains little of what people think of as “blood,” as the red blood cells (RBCs) can actually be detrimental to a cord blood treatment. (As we’ll discuss later, one of the chief goals of cord blood processing is to greatly reduce the volume of red blood cells in any cord blood collection.)
In addition to cord blood banking as an eligible FSA expense, you can also benefit from certain tax advantages to store your baby’s cord blood. As of 2013, if your child or a family member has a medical condition that might be expected to improve (through the use of cord blood), you can deduct your out-of-pocket expenses from your income taxes!
Cord blood donation doesn’t cost anything for parents. Public cord blood banks pay for everything which includes the collection, testing, and storing of umbilical cord blood. This means that cord blood donation is not possible in every hospital.
According to Cord Blood Registry, cord blood is defined as “the blood that remains in your baby’s umbilical cord after the cord has been cut, is a rich source of unique stem cells that can be used in medical treatments.”  Cord blood has been shown to help treat over 80 diseases, such as leukemia, other cancers, and blood disorders.  This cord blood, which can be safely removed from your newborn’s already-cut umbilical cord, can be privately stored for the purpose of possible use in the future for your child or family member.  (It can also be donated to a public bank, but this is not widely available)
There are a number of different processing methods out there for a cord blood bank to use, and the processing method can ultimately affect the purity of the final product, which we’ll explain in a minute. Once the stem and immune system cells have been isolated and extracted from the plasma and red blood cell, they are mixed with a cryo-protectant and stored in a cryo-bag. We overwrap our bags for added protection and use a technique called “controlled-rate freezing” to prepare the cells for long-term storage. The overwrapped cryo-bag is housed in a protective metal cassette and placed in vapor-phase liquid nitrogen freezer for long-term preservation.
People who are in need of a transplant are more likely to find a match from a donor of the same ethnic descent. There are fewer racial minorities in the national registries, so finding a match can be more difficult.5
Tissue is typed and listed on the registry of the C.W. Bill Young Cell Transplantation Program, also called the Be The Match Registry®. (The registry is a listing of potential marrow donors and donated cord blood units. When a patient needs a transplant, the registry is searched to find a matching marrow donor or cord blood unit.) It’s frozen in a liquid nitrogen freezer and stored, so if the unit is selected as a match for a patient needing a transplant, it will be available.